STORIES OF JODENSAVANNE

Antecedents and Remnants of Jodensavanne

Today all that remains of Jodensavanne, the first permanent Jewish plantation settlement in the Americas, is a brick ruin of the formerly grand synagogue, the first of any architectural significance in the New World. Additionally there remain two overgrown...

Description of The Jodensavanne 1828

Today all that remains of Jodensavanne, the first permanent Jewish plantation settlement in the Americas, is a brick ruin of the formerly grand synagogue, the first of any architectural significance in the New World. Additionally there remain two overgrown...

Creole Jews: Negotiating Community in Colonial Suriname

“I was born in 1936. My mother came from an orthodox family; she was Portuguese. As a little boy, her father still lived at Jodensavanne. He visited the city [Paramaribo] only during the [Jewish] holidays. At home, we lived quite kosher and made our own salted beef...

Creole languages and their uses: the example of colonial Suriname

This article describes the sources for, and the origins and uses of, the creole languages in the Dutch colony of eighteenth-century Suriname – those created and spoken among slaves on the plantations, among the free black Maroons in the jungle villages and among the mixed...

The Jodensavanne in 1859

Lieutenant G.W.C. Voorduin (1830-1910) was stationed as a naval officer for six years in Suriname and the Netherlands Antilles. In Suriname he produced beautiful watercolors, including of Jodensavanne, Albina, and the Waterkant in Paramaribo. He also made some...

The Jodensavanne in 1873

The infantry captain G. P. H. Zimmermann was charged in 1873 with taking up the military posts. He made a map of it, as well as a number of watercolors and descriptions. The general descriptions are partly copied from sources available to him; thus the history of the...

Swearing in of the civil divisions in 1770

This is part of the official journal of Governor Jan Nepveu, describing the swearing-in of the civilian divisions at Torarica, Jodensavanne, and Para. En passant one gets a good impression of the Savanne. From the description it is easy to conclude that the Jodensavanne division...

The Archive of The Dutch-Portuguese-Israelite Congregation in Suriname Until Around 1864

According to the information in the church archives, the foundation of the Portuguese Jewish congregation in Suriname probably took place in the year 5422 (1661/62). When the congregation was several years old, the Hebrew nation in Suriname acquired from the...

Pioneers of Pauroma

During centuries of suppression, the Sephardic community had reacted by building a powerful network of external relations, as well as a high degree of organization within the Jewish community. In this way they were able to react to the willful decisions of European...

Pomtajer: exploring the potential of under-utilized specie in domestic cuisine and gastronomy

Dutch artist and culinary journalist Karin Vaneker researches and explores the potential of Pomtajer (Xanthosoma spp.) in domestic cuisine and gastronomy. This venture started in 2003, when someone asked (her) if the highly popular Surinamese oven dish Pom was of...

Rare and Newly Restored 18th-Century Synagogue from Suriname
To Be Highlight of Israel Museum’s New Synagogue Route

A newly restored 18th-century synagogue from Suriname – one of only two remaining examples – will be a highlight of the Israel Museum’s newly installed Mandel Wing for Jewish Art and Life, on view beginning July 26, 2010, when the Museum opens its expanded and...

Recife, Vicus Judeorum: The Space of Judaism in Dutch Recife

My project focuses on the spatial question of the Jewish community in Dutch Recife (1630-1654), its parallel with the building of urban space and its relevance for the social interaction of Jews with the other groups that divided that space. I am interested in comprehending...

Speaking Tombs

Last month Jodensavanne was added to the world monuments list of 100 most endangered sites 2000-2001 of World Monument Watch. The prestigious listing signifies the historical value and international recognition of the site. One must ask if Jodensavanne is to be...

Still Life: Sephardi, Ashkenazi, and West African Art and Form in Suriname’s Jewish Cemeteries

The present essay examines from a historical viewpoint the art of selected tombstones from Suriname’s oldest Jewish burial plots, which date from the late seventeenth through the early nineteenth centuries. Particular attention is given to influences resulting from the...

Surinam to Jamaica 1675

On July 1667, the Peace of Breda ended the second Anglo-Dutch war. Under the terms of peace. Surinam was ceded to the Dutch (Zeeland). The Articles of Surrender of the Colony of Surinam were agreed, upon the ship Zealand, on 16 March 1667 and confirmed by the...

Sentenced to Death

On January 16, 1804, two young planters were sentenced to death by the Court of Justice in the colony of Suriname for murder. The author accidentally discovered this controversial case that kept Paramaribo under its spell for months, when he was looking for family tree records...

The Beth Haim Cemetery at Jodensavanne in 1946

On 1943-46, during the Second World War, a group of war internees carried out a cleanup and research programme at the Jodensavanne. They made a complete inventory of the Beth Haim cemetery, and produced an accurate map. They tried to decipher as many stones as...

What Remained of the Cemetery and the Synagouge of The Jews-Savannah in Suriname

About ten hours rowing from Paramaribo - more than fifty kilometers in a straight line - there was a village at the time, which was named after the Jews living there, the Joden-Savanna. This one Jews, from Portugal, had come to Suriname in different groups and...